Organizing

“There is a time to be tough, a time to be adamant, a time to be open to compromise and a time to reach agreement”
— James R Hoffa

Why Organize

There are many reasons why we organize:

  • Workers may be concerned with the lack of safety measures on their jobsite, perhaps the employer is disciplining workers for refusing unsafe work.
  • Maybe the employer doesn’t want to send the workers to technical training in fear that they may become more employable.
  • Maybe the supervisors treat the workers poorly.
  • Maybe the workers feel that they deserve better pay for what they are doing.
  • Workers might feel that they deserve health benefits and a pension.
  • Life insurance is a big one, is your employer going to take care of your family if you were injured or killed at work?

If you are unhappy with your current employer then it may be time to organize!

Organizing takes place when union “organizers” provide information to unrepresented workers in order to encourage them to join a union. When the workers of a non-union company decide that they want representation, it can be for a number of reasons. Better wages, pension plans, health benefits and safer worksite conditions are just a few of the reasons to contact an organizer. Organizers may also contact these workers through site visits, mutual friends or family, and social media.

The organizer’s objective is to provide proper representation to all of the workers of the non-union company through a Collective Agreement, which both the Union and the Employer are bound to. Organizers are knowledgeable of the Labour Laws of each jurisdiction, they can be the voice for unrepresented workers when issues need to be brought forward to an employer.

Workers of ANY company can choose to be union, it is illegal for the company to deny them of this RIGHT.

Course Date

Fall Protection

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of the training program, you will be knowledgeable and/or demonstrate proficiency in:

  • Eliminating fall hazards
  • Legislation & standards pertaining to fall protection
  • Employer and worker responsibilities
  • Recent statistical information, workplace incidents, and the need for training
  • Methods of eliminating, analyzing, preventing, and controlling falls
  • Rescue and escape planning
  • Pre-use visual inspections
  • Reporting deficiencies
  • Impact forces
  • Fall clearance
  • Fall protection systems
  • Fall protection system components

Course Date

Elevated Work Platform (EWP)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Upon successful completion of the training program, you will be knowledgeable and/or demonstrate proficiency in:
  • Eliminating fall hazards
  • Legislation & standards pertaining to fall protection
  • Employer and worker responsibilities
  • Recent statistical information, workplace incidents, and the need for training
  • Methods of eliminating, analyzing, preventing, and controlling falls
  • Rescue and escape planning
  • Pre-use visual inspections
  • Reporting deficiencies
  • Impact forces
  • Fall clearance
  • Fall protection systems
  • Fall protection system components

COURSE PRE-REQUISITE

  • A Valid Fall Protection ticket is required prior to attending this course.

Course Date

Telehandler/Rough Terrain Forklift

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Safety Regulations & Standards
  • Telehandler Fundamentals
  • Field Hazard Identification
  • Preventative Maintenance & Procedures (Pre-Operational Inspections)
  • Job Safety Analysis
  • Safe Operation
  • Principle of Balance & Stability
  • Proper Start Up & Shut Down Protocol
  • Operating on Slopes
  • Safe Load Handling & Techniques
  • Load Charts

August 45th, 2032

First Aid

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Red Cross
  • Preparing to Respond
  • EMS System
  • Check, Call, Care
  • Airway Emergencies
  • Breathing and Circulation Emergencies
  • First Aid for Respiratory & Cardiac Arrest
  • Head & Spine Injuries
  • Bone, Muscle & Joint Injuries
  • Wound Care
  • Sudden Medical Emergencies
  • Environmental Emergencies
  • Poisons

How Employers Prevent Unions

Be informed

When workers seek to exercise the right to form a union, they nearly always run into a buzz saw of employer threats, intimidation, and coercion such as:

  • Captive audience meetings
  • One-on-one meetings with supervisors
  • Threats to close or move the workplace if workers vote to unionize
  • Hiring professional consultants (union-busters) to coordinate anti-worker campaigns
  • Firing workers for union activity

According to Human Rights Watch, the treatment of workers by employers and the failure of the Canadian government to prevent it constitute a serious violation of human rights. Their report says, “Many workers are spied on, harassed, pressured, threatened, suspended, fired, deported or otherwise victimized in reprisal for their exercise of the right to choose a union.”

The consequences have been devastating for all of Canadian society. When collective bargaining is suppressed, wages lag, inequality and poverty grow, race and gender pay gaps widen, society’s safety net is strained, and civic and political participation are undermined.

Be Aware

Things Your Employer Cannot Do

  • Attend any union meeting, park across the street from the hall or engage in any undercover activity which would indicate that the employees are being kept under surveillance to determine who is and who is not participating in the union program.
  • Tell employees that the company will fire or punish them if they engage in union activity.
  • Lay off, discharge, discipline any employee for union activity.
  • Grant employees wage increases, special concessions or benefits in order to keep the union out.
  • Bar employee-union representatives from soliciting employees’ memberships on or off the company property during non-waking hours.
  • Ask employees about union matters, meetings, etc. (Some employees may, of their own accord, walk up and tell of such matters. It is not an unfair labour practice to listen, but to ask questions to obtain additional information is illegal).
  • Ask employees what they think about the union or a union representative once the employee refuses to discuss it.
  • Ask employees how they intend to vote.
  • Threaten employees with reprisal for participating in union activities. For example, threaten to move the plant or close the business, curtail operations or reduce employees’ benefits.
  • Promise benefits to employees if they reject the union.
  • Give financial support or other assistance to a union.
  • Announce that the company will not deal with the union.
  • Threaten to close, in fact close, or move plant in order to avoid dealing with a union.
  • Ask employees whether or not they belong to a union, or have signed up for union representation.
  • Ask an employee, during the hiring interview, about his affiliation with a labour organization or how he feels about unions.
  • Make anti-union statements or act in a way that might show preference for a non-union man.
  • Make distinctions between union and non-union employees when signing overtime work or desirable work.
  • Purposely team up non-union men and keep them apart from those supporting the union.
  • Transfer workers on the basis of union affiliations or activities.
  • Choose employees to be laid off in order to weaken the union’s strength or discourage membership in the union.
  • Discriminate against union people when disciplining employees.
  • By nature of work assignments, create conditions intended to get rid of an employee because of his union activity.
  • Fail to grant a scheduled benefit or wage increase because of union activity.
  • Deviate from company policy for the purpose of getting rid of a union supporter.
  • Take action that adversely affects an employee’s job or pay rate because of union activity.
  • Threaten workers or coerce them in an attempt to influence their vote.
  • Threaten a union member through a third party.
  • Promise employees a reward or future benefit if they decide “no union”.
  • Tell employees overtime work (and premium pay) will be discontinued if the plant is unionized.
  • Say unionization will force the company to lay off employees.
  • Say unionization will do away with vacations or other benefits and privileges presently in effect.
  • Promise employees promotions, raises or other benefits if they get out of the union or refrain from joining the union.
  • Start a petition or circular against the union or encourage or take part in its circulation if started by employees.
  • Urge employees to try to induce others to oppose the union or keep out of it.
  • Visit the homes of employees to urge them to reject the union.

What Unions Have Done for Us

Improving safety, wages, and more

Union members earn 28 percent more than non-union workers. But stronger unions raise living standards and improve the quality of life for everyone. In the Provinces in which unions are the strongest, there is less poverty, higher household income, more education spending, and better public policy than in the Provinces where unions are weakest.

Unions Encourage Democracy: Unions encourage voting and other forms of political participation by members and other social groups with common interests. It has estimated that for every 1 percent decline in union membership there is a 0.4 percent decline in voter participation.

  • 8-hour day
  • 5-day work week
  • Health Insurance
  • Good pensions
  • Higher wages
  • Job security
  • Overtime pay
  • Job safety
  • Family and medical leave
  • Fair treatment for women, people of all ethnic backgrounds, and those with disabilities

Where it Started

1872: The fight for a shorter work-week

Imagine working at least ten or more hours a day. Every day. That’s what many of Toronto’s print workers’ daily lives looked like in 1872, when the Toronto Typographical Union demanded a nine-hour workday from the city’s publishers.

Employers refused, and the printers walked off the job on March 25, 1872. Publishers hired replacement workers, but the strikers had earned widespread support from other Toronto workers.

The result: a crowd of 10,000 supporters showed up for a rally at Queen’s Park on April 15, 1872. In those days, union activity was criminal, and then Toronto Globe publisher George Brown had the strike committee arrested for criminal conspiracy the next day. The community protested in support of those arrested.

Prime Minister John A. Macdonald – no friend of publisher and Reform politician George Brown – introduced the Trade Union Act on April 18, 1872, legalizing and protecting unions. The strike in Toronto evolved into the “Nine-Hour Movement”. Toronto printers led to annual celebrations of Labour Day, celebrated today in communities across Canada every year.

Organizing Team

District Council of Western Canada Organizing Team

Our organization is broken down into District Councils, Local 725 is a proud part of the District Council of Western Canada. We have a great organizing team who are knowledgeable and easy to talk to.

For questions about how to organize your current employer, or just general questions about organizing please feel free to call Local 725 at (403) 291-1300 or Mike Brodziak (organizer) at (306) 536-9771

Or click the link below to visit the District Council Organizing webpage.

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt